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Branches of the Aorta Abdominal Region

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BRANCHES OF THE AORTA ANATOMY

Between the diaphragm and the area of the body at an equal level to the fourth lumbar vertebrate lies the abdominal region of the aorta. Here, it is segregated into the right and left common iliac arteries. The first branches to break from the abdominal region of the aorta are the inferior phrenic arteries. These are followed by the short but thick celiac trunk. The celiac trunk is solitary and nearly immediately breaks again into three arteries. The splenic artery splits off to carry the necessary blood to the spleen.

BRANCHES OF THE AORTA STRUCTURE

The left gastric artery branches out to take the blood supply to the stomach. The third and final branch from the celiac trunk is the common hepatic artery that carries the blood to the liver. Another solitary vessel, known as the superior mesenteric artery, draws up along the anterior abdominal region of the aorta which is positioned slightly under the celiac trunk. The cecum, appendix, ascending colon, the proximal 2/3 of the transverse colon, and with the exception of the duodenum, the small intestine all receive their necessary blood supply from the superior mesenteric artery.

Supplying blood to the kidneys, the following branch from the aorta are the renal arteries, which as a pair rise from the abdominal region of the aorta. Positioned slightly above those arteries, the adrenal glands are served by the suprarenal arteries, which are smaller than the renal arteries. Slightly below the renal arteries, male and female bodies have different arteries to serve the various sex organs. The male body has testicular arteries which provide the appropriate blood supply to the testicles while the female body carries ovarian arteries to serve the ovaries.

BRANCHES OF THE AORTA DIAGRAM

Branches of the Aorta Abdominal Region
Image: Branches Of The Aorta Abdominal Region

BRANCHES OF THE AORTA FUNCTIONS

The final major branch stemming off from the aorta in the abdominal region is the inferior mesenteric artery. Branching out slightly before the iliac bifurcation, it is responsible for meeting the demands of the distal third of the transverse colon, the descending colon, the sigmoid colon, and the rectum.


The various muscles of the lumbar region as well as the spinal cord are supplied via several smaller lumbar arteries which branch off the aorta as well as additional small branches that serve the demands of the sacrum and coccyx, which would be the solitary middle sacral artery.
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