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Manus

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MANUS ANATOMY

The manus, or the hand, is comprised of 27 bones which are grouped by location and function. Included in these groups are the carpus, the metacarpus, and the phalanges.

CARPUS



The carpus is also commonly referred to as the wrist and is comprised of eight carpal bones which are designed in 2 transverse rows, each containing 4 bones. The proximal row consists of the scaphoid, the lunate, the triquetrum, and pisiform if naming from the thumb side and continuing medially.

The pisiform is contributed to by the tendon as a sesamoid bone. The distal row counting in the same direction is comprised of the trapezium, trapezoid, capitate, and hamate.

The trapezium is also known as the greater multangular and the trapezoid is also known as the lesser multangular. The scaphoid in conjunction with the lunate, when discussing the proximal row, join with the distal end of the radius.

MANUS DIAGRAM

Manus
Image: Manus


METACARPUS



5 metacarpal bones create the structure of the hand. Each individual metacarpal bone is comprised of the proximal base followed by the body, and a distal rounded head that is for a fit with the base of the proximal phalanx. The knuckles visible in a clenched fist are formed by the distally located heads of each metacarpal bone.

CARPUS DIAGRAM

Carpus
Image: Carpus


PHALANGES



The finger bones are created from a set of 14 phalanges. A phalanx is known as one individual finger bone. The 3 rows of phalanges are evenly distributed according to size to create the rows of proximal, middle, and distal. The thumb, also known as the pollex, is devoid of the middle bone. To determine the anatomical position, the digits are numbered 1 through 5 beginning with the lateral side.

PHALANGES DIAGRAM

Phalanges
Image: Phalanges































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