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Muscles of the vertebral column

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MUSCLES OF THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN ANATOMY

The muscles of the vertebral column are exceptionally strong and well designed considering they are required to fight the effects of gravity. These muscles are designed to exhibit flexible motion as well as structural support for one of the most complex areas of the human body.

MUSCLES OF THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN STRUCTURE

The vertebral column can withstand flexing, as well as hyper-extending, rotation as well as counter rotation, and lateral flexing as well as extension. It has basically a 360 degree range of motion to contend with.

The rectus abdominis is found in the abdominal muscles, but it is also responsible for flexing the vertebral column. It is an elongated muscle that resembles a strap.

Along the posterior side of the vertebral column, the extensor muscles can be located. These muscles are designed to be at least twice as strong as those muscles responsible for flexor muscles. Their jobs entail numerous positional challenges, including activities such as lifting large and heavy loads, which works them very hard against the natural occurrence of gravity. The extensor muscles are created by two individual groups based on their location in the body; the superficial and the deep extensors.

MUSCLES OF THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN DIAGRAM

Muscles of the vertebral column
Image: Muscles Of The Vertebral Column




One of the largest muscle groups runs from the sacrum all the way to the skull. These are known as the erector spinae muscles and they are considered to be superficial muscles. Three variations of muscle, the longissimus, the iliocostalis, and the spinalis muscles, actually create the spinae muscles in their entirety. Each variation also becomes partially comprised of additional overlapping muscle variations dispersed into small slips.

MUSCLES OF THE VERTEBRAL COLUMN FUNCTIONS

The group in the most lateral position is the iliocostalis. The longissimus remains in the secondary position while the medial position belongs to the spinalis. The spinous processes which belong to the vertebrates come into direct physical contact with the spinalis group.

The quadratus lumborum is buried deep with its origination point along the iliac crest and the lower three lumbar vertebrates. It has two defined insertion points, along the transverse processes of the first four lumbar vertebrates and the inferior edge of the twelfth rib. Individual contraction of either quadtratus lumborum creates a lateral flexion of the spine to the same side of the contraction. When both muscles contract simultaneously, the result is extension of the lumbar region of the back.
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