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Uterine tubes

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UTERINE TUBES ANATOMY

Uterine tubes go by numerous various names such as fallopian tubes or oviducts. Their basic responsibility is to provide a method of transportation for oocytes from the ovaries to their destination, the uterus. Measuring approximately 10 cm long and .7 cm in diameter, these tubes are located between the folds of the membranous broad ligament. The falliopian tubes have an open end which resembles a funnel called the infundibulum. The infundibulum is positioned close to the ovary but remains separate. Fimbriae are the process which help to wave the oocytes into the fallopian tube, are shaped liked small fringed fingers, and project from the margins of the infundibulum. Covering the lateral surface of the ovary, they undulate in waves to help bring the oocytes in the appropriate direction and into the lumen of the tube. The oocyte can then travel down the tube, which is aligned medially and inferiorly in the open cavity that is the uterus.

UTERINE TUBES STRUCTURE

The largest segment of the fallopian tube is called the ampulla. The wall which contains the uterus is complrised of 3 layers of histological material. Cilia laden columnar epithelium is layered in multiple folds to create the internal mucosa lines of the lumen. The middle layer is known as the muscularis and is comprised of a thick circular layer of smooth muscular tissue accompanied by a thin outer layer of the same smooth muscle tissue. Between the undulation of the cilia and the and peristaltic contractions of the muscularis the oocyte are floated down the lumen of the fallopian tubes. For 4 to 5 days the oocyte begins its journey through the fallopian tube. The outer layer of the fallopian tube is considered an element of the visceral peritoneum.

UTERINE TUBES DIAGRAM

Uterine tubes
Image: Uterine Tubes


While the oocyte is working its way down the fallopian tube, this is the time when spermatozoa may meet with the oocyte and begin the process of fertilization. If the fertilization will occur, it will occur within hours after the spermatozoon reaches the female fallopian tubes. A fertilized zygote will then head toward the uterus for implantation. A developing embryo is also referred to as a blastocyst. If a blastocyst implants in the fallopian tube instead of reaching the uterus, this results in an atopic pregnancy and must be terminated in order the female to survive.


The uterine tubes receive their blood supply via the uterine arteries and the ovarian arteries. These arteries run along the broad ligament. Each fallopian tube us equipped with parasympathetic innervation which originates from the hypo-gastric plexus along with the pelvic splanchnic nerves. The primary responsibility of the nerves that run to the fallopian tubes if to regulate the actions between the smooth muscle tissue as well as the blood vessels. The draining requires through the veins occurs via the uterine veins which run alongside the uterine arteries.
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