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Veins of the Upper Extremity

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VEINS OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY ANATOMY

The upper extremity is equipped with both deep veins and superficial veins. There is a vast tubular network of veins just below the skin of the upper extremity. The deeper veins are buried well beneath the skin surface and run parallel to the arteries.

The deep and superficial palmar arches of the hand empty into the radial and ulnar veins, which lie laterally and medially on each side of the arm, respectively.

VEINS OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY STRUCTURE

The brachial vein is formed when the radial and ulnar veins conjoin the cubital fossa. Traveling up the medial side of the arm, the basilica vein and the cephalic vein are then located, these being the main veins of the region. Passing medially on the ulna side of the forearm, the brachial vein and the basilic vein conjoin near the head of the humerus. This then forms the larger axillary vein.

The radial side of the hand and forearm, radially, are then drained by the cephalic vein which travels upward to meet the axillary vein near the shoulder. The axillary vein conjoins the subclavian vein after passing under the first rib. The subclavian vein conjoins with the internal jugular vein which creates the brachiocephalic vein that serves that side of the body.

VEINS OF THE UPPER EXTREMITY DIAGRAM

Veins of the Upper Extremity
Image: Veins Of The Upper Extremity
The superficial veins along the cubital fossa of the elbow conjoins the cubital vein with the cephalic vein and then merges with the basilica vein along the medial side. The medial cubital vein is the medical site for common blood withdrawals from the body. The veins which create the superior vena cava, the conjoined brachiocephalic veins, are devoid of the typical valves which the veins throughout the rest of the body are equipped.








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