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Urinalysis

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URINALYSIS DEFINITION

Urinalysis is a medical test that analyzes a sample of your urine, hence the term. This test is used to detect and evaluate a wide range of illnesses, typically including diabetes, kidney disease, and urinary tract infection. It involves the assessment of the content, concentration, and appearance of your urine.

URINALYSIS PURPOSE

Urinalysis is a common test that's recommended for a multitude of reasons. It could be done to assess how healthy you are overall, to help in the diagnosis of a medical condition or possible sickness, and to monitor an already existing and diagnosed disease or disorder. It's also used for pregnancy tests and drug screening.

URINALYSIS RISKS

There are no risks associated with giving a urine sample for urinalysis.

URINALYSIS PREPARATION REQUIRED

Eating and drinking normally prior to the test won't affect the test results in any significant way. If you have any other tests to take along with urinalysis, then you may have to prepare for those tests instead by not eating or drinking. Tell your doctor what medication you've been taking, because some vitamins and nonprescription drugs can affect the results of your urinary exam.

URINALYSIS PROCEDURE

URINALYSIS
Image: URINALYSIS
A urine sample is needed when undergoing urinalysis. You may collect your sample back at home or do it at your doctor's office depending on your situation and which course of action is most convenient for you. To obtain accurate results, you must cleanse the urinary opening, urinate a little on the toilet, urinate at least two ounces into the collection container, finish urinating on the toilet, and then send the sample to your doctor.

URINALYSIS COMPLICATIONS

You will not suffer from any complications by undergoing urinalysis.

URINALYSIS SIDE EFFECTS

Urinalysis is free of side effects.

URINALYSIS RESULTS

Your urinalysis will be examined in three ways: Microscopic exam, dipstick test, and visual exam. The microscopic exam checks the presence of crystals (may form kidney stones), bacteria, yeasts, epithelial cells, and casts (tube-shaped proteins) as well as the levels of red blood cells and white blood cells in the sample. The dipstick test measures acidity, concentration of particles, protein levels, sugar levels, ketone levels, bilirubin levels, blood, and evidence of infection. Finally, the visual exam analyzes the urine's appearance to the naked eye (e.g. if it's cloudy or not and what color it is).
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